Un Adjective Agreement

Some examples of common Spanish masculine adjectives are: Afortunado (happy), Alto (large), Bajo (short), Bueno (good), Estupendo (large), Famoso (famous), Malo (bad) and Pequeño (small) It is possible to render some masculine adjectives feminine by adding -A at the end when the words end with a consonant, but not in all cases, for example „Trabajador / Trabajadora“ (correct) and „Popular / Populara“ (false). Most nationalities also change gender, including some that end with consonants such as „español->española“. As the name suggests, descriptive adjectives describe a certain quality of a noun. Well, it becomes obvious that it`s too easy. Suppose you mean interesting movies and plays. The French word film is masculine, but the word or expression pièce (de théâtre) (the French for „jeu“ in the theatrical sense) is feminine. The same goes for French, so that in practice a plural is common with nouns associated with or or ni: in such cases, the noun and articles in French are placed in the plural, but each adjective is placed in the singular: most French adjectives are made in the plural by adding the singular form of the adjective (either masculine or feminine) -s: In our introduction to the form of French adjectives, we mentioned that, for example, an -e is normally added in the spelling of an adjective in both the feminine and plural. But we didn`t work too much on how to decide if you need the feminine and/or plural form of the adjective: we simply assumed that the adjective would be used next to a specific topic and that the gender and number of adjectives would match that single subnose. Now look at this unusual summary table of Spanish adjectives! (*Note that there is also an accent tomb above the first – e in the feminine form of this adjective) Most adjectives in French come according to the noun, unlike English.

For example, in French, unlike English, most adjectives come according to the noun. Learn more about compiling sentences containing adjectives. Most French adjectives are placed according to the nouns they describe. Some French adjectives precede the nouns they describe. (See: French grammar: adjective placement) Spanish adjectives are usually listed in dictionaries in their masculine singular form, so it`s important to know how to compare these masculine singularadjectives with the subject you`re describing right now. . . .